Scenes from a County Fair

On September 22, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski


I live in the City of Pittsburgh. Our company is in the city. Most of our clients and ad agencies are located in cities across the state. It’s easy to forget that Pennsylvania is mostly rural farm country.

Once a year, my wife Carol and I travel an hour and a half north of Pittsburgh to Meadville, Pennsylvania. It’s the annual site of the Crawford County Fair, the largest agricultural and livestock exhibition in the state. For an entire week, kids and adults from all over Northwest Pennsylvania show off the best looking animals they’ve raised. 4H members and others take pride in their sheep, cattle, pigs, horses, goats, ducks and chicken. Every exhibitor hopes to win a prize and the bragging rights to having raised a “best of show” animal at the Crawford County Fair.

I call this video “Scenes from a Pennsylvania County Fair” because every week in the summer, scenes like these repeat themselves in rural towns across the state and throughout the country. It’s was a hot, sticky 92 degrees at the fair but everybody enjoyed walking the fairgrounds, eating junk food and catching up with their old friends.

This video is a compilation of 1080P footage I shot in 2008 and 2011. It’s a salute to the hard working people we sometimes take for granted…

American “Pop” Artist, Burton Morris

On May 3, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski

Director, Glenn Przyborski and artist, Burton Morris

Just finished shooting an internet video project with Burton Morris, one of the country’s hottest artists. I love his energetic, vivid, fun style of unique “Pop” art, which is a tribute to artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. Although Burton now resides in L.A., he has family and professional ties to his home town of Pittsburgh, PA. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Burton started his career as an art director at several major Pittsburgh ad agencies.

Burton Morris has created major works for CocaCola, The Academy Awards, Heinz, the Olympics, Absolut Vodka and hundreds of other corporations. Although he’s an internationally famous artist, Burton Morris’ is also one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet.

He just completed a fun project for Eat ‘n Park Restaurants. Burton created his own original art to celebrate the 25th anniversary of “Smiley,” Eat ‘n Park’s corporate cookie icon. This summer, Burton Morris’ original artwork will adorn t-shirts, coffee mugs and other items that are sold in Eat ‘n Park’s chain of over 80 restaurants.

Sorry, I can’t reveal Burton’s original “Smiley” artwork, ’till it’s unveiled in June!… stay tuned!

Eat ‘n Park’s Strawberry Pie TV

On April 28, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski


I used Panasonic’s new AF100 to shoot the latest HDTV campaign for Eat ‘n Park, a Pittsburgh based chain of restaurants. In one 10 hour shoot day, we had to set, light and stage a sequence inside the company’s test kitchen. This included several tasty food shots of strawberry pies. The second half of the day was used to film “customer testimonials” and customer interaction with country singer and company spokesperson, Sarah Marince. (Sarah just celebrated her 21st birthday!)

The shots inside Eat ‘n Park’s test kitchen were lit with 3, 1200 watt Arri HMI’s located outside the kitchen’s windows. To create a warm feel of early morning sunlight, we put CTO gel on the HMI’s. The interior fill light was from 12″ x 12″ daylight balanced LED panels. I manually set the AF100’s color balance to 4700K to keep the warm feel without going too yellow or orange. Most of the kitchen scenes were shot from a Fisher 10 crab dolly. For the pie cutaways, I mounted my AF100 on a small, homemade tabletop dolly with skate wheels. I used my Olympus 14-35mm F2 lens for the wide and medium wide shots and an older Canon 85mm F1.2 FD lens for close-ups.

A few of the in-restaurant scenes were filmed from the Fisher crab, but for most I used a Manfrotto mono-pod. This created a more spontaneous and unpredictable feel to the back and forth dialogue. Most of these scenes were shot with a EF series, Canon 24-70 F2.8L lens, wide open at F2.8. All the in-restaurant footage was lit with HMI’s outside the restaurant and LED panels and white bounce cards inside. We exchanged all the warm-white CFL bulbs for 5000K lamps.

The second portion of the video is a movie theater ad that plays between shows in hundreds of theaters in Western Pennsylvania. I shot this simple on-camera delivery spot at the end of our shoot day.

New Technology HDTV Cameras

On April 12, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski

Przyborski shoots with Panasonic's new AF100 HDTV camera

The biggest trend in commercial production is to create images with very shallow, film-like depth-of-field. This “look” was easy with 35mm movie film. As a general rule, the larger the film frame or imaging device, the “tighter” the depth-of-field and more selective the focus. This contrasts with previous HDTV digital cameras that achieved sharp focus throughout the entire frame.

 

Although I love film and have shot over 2,000,000 feet of it… today’s budget for a typical spot doesn’t have the luxury of $10K to $20K for 35mm film stock, processing, HDTV transferring and sync-ups.

Using “film-like” shallow depth-of-field to separate actors or products from a scene’s background can now be achieved with new, cost-effective cameras from Sony and Panasonic. They use large scale digital imagers that approximate the size of 35mm film negative. Since these cameras record to solid state memory, there’s no added size, weight or expense related a tape mechanism.

I recently shot a series of commercials with Panasonic’s new AF100. I love the fact that all my Canon and Nikon 35mm lenses work perfectly with this camera. Plus, it will shoot 1080P, true slow-motion at 60 frames-per-second. I don’t have a lot in common with James Cameron, but we both agree that professional cameras need to be smaller and lighter.  Technology marches on…

Arena Football Home Opener!

On March 15, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski

Judy Gurchak, Dave and Julie Didiano, Jocelyn Wrzosek

The home opener for the Pittsburgh Power, was fun and at times, very exciting! It was an all-Pennsylvania battle with the Philadelphia Soul winning in overtime. After every touchdown, the full-house crowd at the Consol Energy Center went crazy! The event was broadcast nationally on NFL Networks.

Arena Football is a new entertainment concept in Pittsburgh, but considering the possibility of the NFL player lockout… it just might catch on.

Eat ‘n Park’s TV Campaign

On February 7, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski

With over 75 restaurants throughout Western Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia, Eat ‘n Park called on Przyborski Productions to shoot their ongoing testimonial campaign. VP of Creative Services, Cliff Miller and Senior VP of Marketing, Kevin O’Connell worked with director/cinematographer Glenn Przyborski to establish a fun, free-spirited look and feel for the very successful marking campaign.

Glenn shoots the on-going, HDTV campaign using a specially modified Canon 5D digital camera. The camera’s extremely shallow depth of field yields an intimate portrait of Sarah and featured customers, while blurring background action.

Eat ‘n Park spots are always shot in busy restaurants, so it’s important that guests are not disrupted. Before dawn, dozens of ceiling lights are exchanged with special daylight bulbs. Powerful HMI’s are used outside to stream “daylight” into the restaurant. Przyborski also uses low power LED panels as fill light on featured customers.

WVU Healthcare

On January 4, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Glenn Przyborski

WVU Healthcare is the largest hospital system in West Virginia. Fahlgren Advertising of Columbus, Ohio created the marketing concept and Glenn Przyborski directed and photographed their latest broadcast ad campaign.

Przyborski’s projects are often loaded with high-energy effects, but the new WVUH campaign is a throw back to simpler times. The Fahlgren concept called for 9 key hospital doctors, nurses and administrators to do a couple honest, sincere lines of on-camera copy.

Sometimes the simplest concepts are logistically the most complicated. Doctors can only commit to short, specific time windows. Busy hospital locations are only available at certain times. Judy Gurchak and WVUH producer, Lori Savitch created a doable production schedule for the 2 day shoot. Working with Jay Coughlin and Heidi Specht, Przyborski shot “B-Roll” footage whenever there was a break in sync-sound filming.

Sync sound scenes were shot on a RED One camera and prime lenses. Most “B-Roll” cutaways were shot on a Sony F900R with Canon lenses and a modified Panasonic GH1 camera with Canon FD lenses. Our Pittsburgh based crew made extensive use of LED lighting fixtures to minimize power requirements in the busy hospital complex. Glenn edited the 60 second spot in 1080P at Przyborski Productions. Allen DiCenzo of Circa Music in Dublin created the original music track based on the Aaron Copland composition, “Simple Gifts”.